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What is Oragon.Spring?

Oragon.Spring is a port of Spring.NET 2.02 to .NET Standard.


Spring.NET is an open source application framework that makes building enterprise .NET applications easier.

Providing components based on proven design patterns that can be integrated into all tiers of your application architecture, Spring helps increase development productivity and improve application quality and performance.


This text was adapted from Spring.NET Documentation to describe the Spring.NET and this port.

Overview

Spring.NET is an application framework that provides comprehensive infrastructural support for developing enterprise .NET applications. It allows you to remove incidental complexity when using the base class libraries makes best practices, such as test driven development, easy practices. Spring.NET is created, supported and sustained by SpringSource, this fork, called Oragon.Spring is supported by Luiz Carlos Faria on Oragon Architecture.


The design of Spring.NET is based on the Java version of the Spring Framework, which has shown real-world benefits and is used in thousands of enterprise applications world wide. Spring .NET is not a quick port from the Java version, but rather a 'spiritual port' based on following proven architectural and design patterns in that are not tied to a particular platform. The breadth of functionality in Spring .NET spans application tiers which allows you to treat it as a ‘one stop shop’ but that is not required. Spring .NET is not an all-or-nothing solution. You can use the functionality in its modules independently. 


Enterprise applications typically are composed of a number of a variety of physical tiers and within each tier functionality is often split into functional layers. The business service layer for example typically uses a objects in the data access layer to fulfill a use-case. No matter how your application is architected, at the end of the day there are a variety of objects that collaborate with one another to form the application proper. The objects in an application can thus be said to have dependencies between themselves.


The .NET platform provides a wealth of functionality for architecting and building applications, ranging all the way from the very basic building blocks of primitive types and classes (and the means to define new classes), to rich full-featured application servers and web frameworks. One area that is decidedly conspicuous by its absence is any means of taking the basic building blocks and composing them into a coherent whole; this area has typically been left to the purvey of the architects and developers tasked with building an application (or applications). Now to be fair, there are a number of design patterns devoted to the business of composing the various classes and object instances that makeup an all-singing, all-dancing application. Design patterns such as Factory, Abstract Factory, Builder, Decorator, and Service Locator (to name but a few) have widespread recognition and acceptance within the software development industry (presumably that is why these patterns have been formalized as patterns in the first place). This is all very well, but these patterns are just that: best practices given a name, typically together with a description of what the pattern does, where the pattern is typically best applied, the problems that the application of the pattern addresses, and so forth. Notice that the last paragraph used the phrase “... a description of what the pattern does...”; pattern books and wikis are typically listings of such formalized best practice that you can certainly take away, mull over, and then implement yourself in your application.


The Spring Framework takes best practices that have been proven over the years in numerous applications and formalized as design patterns, and actually codifies these patterns as first class objects that you as an architect and developer can take away and integrate into your own application(s). This is a Very Good Thing Indeed as attested to by the numerous organizations and institutions that have used the Spring Framework to engineer robust, maintainable applications. For example, the IoC component of the Spring Framework addresses the enterprise concern of taking the classes, objects, and services that are to compose an application, by providing a formalized means of composing these various disparate components into a fully working application ready for use

Background

In early 2004, Martin Fowler asked the readers of his site: when talking about Inversion of Control: “the question is, what aspect of control are [they] inverting?”. Fowler then suggested renaming the principle (or at least giving it a more self-explanatory name), and started to use the term Dependency Injection. His article then continued to explain the ideas underpinning the Inversion of Control (IoC) and Dependency Injection (DI) principle. If you need a decent insight into IoC and DI, please do refer to the article : http://martinfowler.com/articles/injection.html.

Modules

The Spring Framework contains a lot of features, which are well-organized into modules shown in the diagram below. The diagram below shows the various core modules of Spring.NET.

Click on the module name for more information.


Spring.Core is the most fundamental part of the framework allowing you to configure your application using Dependency Injection. Other supporting functionality, listed below, is located in Spring.Core


Spring.Aop - Use this module to perform Aspect-Oriented Programming (AOP). AOP centralizes common functionality that can then be declaratively applied across your application in a targeted manner. Spring's aspect library provides predefined easy to use aspects for transactions, logging, performance monitoring, caching, method retry, and exception handling.


Many other projects part of Original Spring .NET are ignored on this fork. They simple does not exist on Oragon Spring.


The Spring.Core module also includes the following additional features:

  • Expression Language - provides efficient querying and manipulation of an object graphs at runtime.

  • Validation Framework - a robust UI agnostic framework for creating complex validation rules for business objects either programatically or declaratively.

  • Data binding Framework - a UI agnostic framework for performing data binding.

  • Dynamic Reflection - provides a high performance reflection API

  • Threading - provides additional concurrency abstractions such as Latch, Semaphore and Thread Local Storage.

  • Resource abstraction - provides a common interface to treat the InputStream from a file and from a URL in a polymorphic and protocol-independent manner.

Usage Scenarios

With the building blocks described above you can use Spring in all sorts of scenarios, from simple stand alone console applications to fully-fledged enterprise applications using Spring's transaction management functionality and web framework integration.


While the Spring framework does not force any particular application architecture it encourages the use of a well layered application architecture with distinct tiers for the presentation, service, data access, and database.

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